Natural Gas Exploration in Argentina is Boosted

Pan American Energy, an oil and natural gas exploration and production company with activities in Argentina, Bolivia and Chile, announced its intention to spend USD 3.4 billion on natural gas exploration and output in Argentina from 2013-2017. According to an Associated Press statement, Argentina is trying to combat an energy deficit that has forced it to import billions of dollars’ worth of fuels each year.

The company says the agreement is similar to one recently reached between the government and YPF (Yacimientos Petrolíferos Fiscales), which is Argentina’s state-run energy company.

U.S. Report Documents RNG as the Solution to a Major U.S. Transportation Challenge

A New York-based energy research organization has published a report: Renewable Natural Gas (RNG): The Solution to a Major Transportation Challenge — that states use of renewable natural gas as a vehicle fuel is a technologically viable alternative to relying exclusively on petroleum-based fuels for transportation. The new publication was prepared by Energy Vision, a New York-based energy research organization, and CALSTART, a California-based leader in clean transportation technologies. It details the many benefits of converting organic wastes into clean vehicle fuel. Read more »

LNG Bunkering Infrastructure Study by Lloyd’s Register

One of the largest obstacles to widespread take-up of LNG as fuel is the lack of a bunkering infrastructure. Lloyd’s Register (LR) has been researching the issues around a bunker network and infrastructure for the shipping industry and initiated a study examining trade patterns and existing bunker trends by ship type and size; examining the fuel consumption requirements; assessing the potential availability of LNG worldwide; and surveying the key stakeholder groups of shipowners and ports to understand their needs. Read the findings here.

LNG fuelled shipping and bunkering Infrastructure Study (pdf, 649kb)

International Best Practices Guide for Landfill Gas Energy Projects

The Global Methane Initiative (GMI)’s new International Best Practices Guide for Landfill Gas Energy (LFGE) Projects provides a broad overview of the development process for LFGE projects and presents the technological, economic and political considerations that typically affect the success of LFGE projects in international settings. The guide presents best practices that encourage environmentally and economically sound LFGE projects and connects stakeholders with available information, tools and services. It is intended for representatives of national, regional, and local governments; landfill owners; energy service providers; corporations and industries; and representatives of not-for-profit organizations. Read more »

AGF Study — Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Models for Developing Fueling Infrastructure

Natural Gas as a Transportation Fuel: Models for Developing Fueling Infrastructure was prepared by American Gas Foundation. It was written to enable local distribution companies (LDCs), and other stakeholders, to better understand the commercial and regulatory considerations involved in entering the NGV refueling market. The study outlines a variety of models that may be employed; recognizing that approaches to this market will vary based on the needs and policy goals of individual regulated service territories. Attention is given to past practices, innovative approaches, and the current and near-term environment that recognizes the important role LDCs will play in establishing natural gas as a mainstream transportation fuel.

AGF Transportation Study 2012 (pdf file)

Biogas for Transport Reaches 50% in Sweden (2011 Stats)

Energigas Sweden, a member-funded industry organisation that works to increase the use of energy gases, published statistics for 2011. A summation of the 2011 production and use of biogas shows that the proportion of biogas that goes to the automotive sector this year is by far the largest. 50% of the produced biogas is upgraded and is now used as a vehicle fuel.

Altogether there are 233 biogas production plants of which 135 sewage treatment plants, 55 landfills, 19 co-digestion plants and five industrial gas plants. Farm biogas plants has increased by five and is now 19 in number. Sewage treatment plants still account for nearly half of the production. The co-digestion plants which include household waste, slaughterhouse waste and manure from farm biogas digested increased volume by almost 20 percent compared to 2010. The amount of biogas from landfills declined simultaneously.

“Despite a glaring demand there is not enough increase in biogas productions. And it is the political signals and long-term rules of the game are missing. The government does not provide any information on the conditions in the future or on operational instruments to get this market,” says Anders Mathiasson, president Energigas Sweden.

(Information from Energigas Sweden news)

Switzerland NGV Update – end 2011

The Swiss Gas Industry Association (erdgas.ch) has reported the number of natural gas vehicles in Switzerland rose to 10,300 in 2011 (up from 9,600 in 2010 according to NGV Global 2010 statistics).

The gas station network in Switzerland now includes 132 stations. Also recorded was an increased sales of natural gas and biogas as fuel – the equivalent of approximately 22.5 million gallons of gasoline, of which biogas (biomethane) amounted to a 21% share.

Across the nation natural gas/biogas at refuelling stations is about 30 percent cheaper than gasoline.

Most of Switzerland’s natural gas comes from Western Europe. The imported natural gas is delivered to approximately two thirds of EU countries and Norway. Almost a quarter comes from development areas in Russia and the rest from various other regions. About half of Switzerland’s supply is purchased under long-term supply agreements with major suppliers in Germany, the Netherlands, France and Italy. These also operate large underground storage facilities. The rest is sourced from contracts with short to very short maturities. There are no contracts with Russian suppliers.

Swissgas is the main importer. Together with German and Austrian partners it is active in the Norwegian natural gas production.

Source: gasorama